Indubitably Indeed

Ask me anything   Submit   Molly, irish/new englander, working on my BS in wildlife conservation
*hmu if you need/want me to tag for anything in particular, or if you have any wildlife questions*

nativenews:

Wampanoag language set to be revitalized by public charter school
[PHOTO: Wopanaak language student holding sign with the text, “My ancestors are pleased with me.” Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project.]
Jessie ‘Little Doe’ Baird, vice chairwoman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, founded the Wampanoag Language Reclamation Project in 1993.
Now, a proposed charter school designed to immerse young children in the Wopanaak language is in the mix for state approval this year, but organizers are still waiting for an invite to make their pitch.
The Weetumuw Wopanaak Charter School is part of the Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project, which aims to preserve and revitalize the native tongue of the Wampanoag ancestors. The school will start with a group of kindergarten and first-grade students and eventually run through the fifth grade and enroll up to 100 students, said charter developer Jennifer Weston. Four of the school day’s six hours will be taught in Wopanaak, with an English/language arts segment being the only exception.
The Language Reclamation Project was one of seven groups that submitted a prospectus to the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education this summer. The department will examine the documents and decide which programs, if any, will move on to the final application stage.
The school’s reach encompasses four Wampanoag tribes and communities: the Assonet Band of Wampanoag, the Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe, the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe.
The state is expected to make its decisions from the final round of applicants by early February, Weston said.

nativenews:

Wampanoag language set to be revitalized by public charter school

[PHOTO: Wopanaak language student holding sign with the text, “My ancestors are pleased with me.” Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project.]

Jessie ‘Little Doe’ Baird, vice chairwoman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, founded the Wampanoag Language Reclamation Project in 1993.

Now, a proposed charter school designed to immerse young children in the Wopanaak language is in the mix for state approval this year, but organizers are still waiting for an invite to make their pitch.

The Weetumuw Wopanaak Charter School is part of the Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project, which aims to preserve and revitalize the native tongue of the Wampanoag ancestors. The school will start with a group of kindergarten and first-grade students and eventually run through the fifth grade and enroll up to 100 students, said charter developer Jennifer Weston. Four of the school day’s six hours will be taught in Wopanaak, with an English/language arts segment being the only exception.

The Language Reclamation Project was one of seven groups that submitted a prospectus to the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education this summer. The department will examine the documents and decide which programs, if any, will move on to the final application stage.

The school’s reach encompasses four Wampanoag tribes and communities: the Assonet Band of Wampanoag, the Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe, the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe.

The state is expected to make its decisions from the final round of applicants by early February, Weston said.

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toxicwinner:

aliens: land on earth
us: gives them a brief overview
aliens: my mama says i gotta come home right now immediately 

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suzysils:

I think I’m going to write a book called “‘Four Hours Is Definitely Enough Sleep’ And Other Lies I Tell Myself”

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libutron:

Mara - Dolichotis sp.
The Maras or Patagonian hares, belonging to the genus Dolichotis, are part of a group of rodents, the Caviidae Family, which includes the cavies and the familiar guinea pigs. Maras are strange animals. Mara’s body resembles a short deer, and the shape of its head is similar to that of the Capybara (member of the same family) but with longer ears.
There are two recognized species of Mara, Dolichotis salinicola (Dwarf Mara), which occurs in Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia; and Dolichotis patagonum (Patagonian Mara), native to Argentina. The latter is considered a Near Threatened species.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©William Warby | Locality: captive (Whipsnade Zoo, Bedfordshire, England (2014)

libutron:

Mara - Dolichotis sp.

The Maras or Patagonian hares, belonging to the genus Dolichotis, are part of a group of rodents, the Caviidae Family, which includes the cavies and the familiar guinea pigs. Maras are strange animals. Mara’s body resembles a short deer, and the shape of its head is similar to that of the Capybara (member of the same family) but with longer ears.

There are two recognized species of Mara, Dolichotis salinicola (Dwarf Mara), which occurs in Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia; and Dolichotis patagonum (Patagonian Mara), native to Argentina. The latter is considered a Near Threatened species.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©William Warby | Locality: captive (Whipsnade Zoo, Bedfordshire, England (2014)

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dragonitehugs:

tinymulder:

i dont know if i believe that richard dawkins is real i think he might be made up

image

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go4photos:

Bison by BrandonDowning

go4photos:

Bison by BrandonDowning

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cool-critters:

Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus)

The kagu is a crested, long-legged, and bluish-grey bird endemic to the dense mountain forests of New Caledonia. Almost flightless, it spends its time on or near the ground, where it hunts its invertebrate prey, and builds a nest of sticks on the forest floor. Kagu are territorial. The kagu is exclusively carnivorous, feeding on a variety of animals with annelid worms, snails and lizards being amongst the most important prey items. Also taken are larvae, spiders, centipedes and insects such as grasshoppers, bugs, and beetles. Kagus are monogamous breeders, generally forming long-term pair bonds that are maintained for many years, even possibly life. Kagu can be long lived, with birds in captivity living for over 20 years. While laying only one egg each breeding season, incubation duties are shared by the parents. Each bird will incubate the egg for 24 hours, with the changeover occurring around noon each day. It is classified as “endangered" by the IUCN.

photo credits: Scott Meyer, Scott McLeod, earthear

— 20 hours ago with 125 notes